Skip to main content

About your Search

20121128
20121206
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the system where currently 48% of gun sales are private which means under federal law not regulated. >> no background check whatsoever. >> absolutely not. it's like having two different systems at the airport where 60% go through the metal detector and 40% don't. >> i never heard it described that way. that's great. >> we might as well extend it to all gun sales. >> that's a fascinating argument and you are of course right. >> steve barton and eric fuller, thanks, both of you for coming on the program. >> what does it mean and by it, i mean the second >> she gets the comedians laughing... >> that's hilarious! >> ...and the thinkers thinking. >> okay, so there's wiggle-room in the ten commandments is what you're telling me. >> she's joy behar. ... and current will let me say anything. >> only on current tv. >> a well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. what does that mean? joining me to answer is adam winkler, professor of constitutional law. explain it, those few words have sparked co
. the federal government does trump state law. people ask, how can we do it right? i tell them go talk to the chief of police in your city, but understand that this is, no matter what you do, a violation of federal law. and if the dea decides that they're going to prosecute you they can, and they will. the year i bought this place, i was rolling pretty hard, living large, you know? thinking you know, complacent like (bleep) everything's cool i'm bad, whatever. (bleep) camp'd on, big time. they came, dea came looking for me specifically, they didn't know who i was, but they photographs, aerials, they had the whole (bleep) thing, had warrants sworn out and i was scared. so i took that money and i bought this place, and i chilled for a year. myself, i know i've done various things in the past.. such as? such as, oh i was a firefighter for years, i was a general contractor, building contractor. i did have a travel agency, come to think of it (laughing), you know, various things. but it's good to maintain a straight sort of an image so people don't just mark you for what you really are righ
laws and we believe that we can prove in a court of law that the founding fathers who were so smart they put six instances in the constitution for a supermajority vote. you can't impeach the president. you can't have a trade bill. you can't amend the constitution. without a supermajority. but if you read the federalist papers and english commonlaw, it is clear that they were fearful that on every issue you needed a supermajority. in 1965, medicare passed. most people like medicare. had 55 votes. if it came before the senate before, it would fail. >> eliot: i gotta -- >> one very quick thing the healthcare legislation was watered down time and again by the use of the filibuster and they kept making it weaker and weaker and weaker because they needed 60 votes to even consider it. >> eliot: not that it matters but if i were a judge, i would say the fact of the constitution specifies where you do need a supermajority implicitly says you don't therefore fill buster is not constitutional. i did not know that about aar
in charge of the agencies and then pushing the bounds of administrative power to change the law and policy through those agencies wherever possible. don't despair. other than healthcare, some of the administration's most important first term accomplishments may fall into this category. for instance, a decision not to deport teenagers effectively implementing without legislative approval, the dream act. support for same-sex marriage and the substantial increase in cafe standards for auto efficiency. using administrative power should not be underestimated. all you need is the right people and the willingness to take a few risks and here with a hat tip to timothy who wrote a superb piece for the new republic focusing on this is a list of a couple of areas. on climate change, use the e.p.a.'s power to extend to existing power plants over time, tough standards on carbon emissions and cancel the keystone pipeline. on immigration, expand the waver program that applies only to kids. their categories of adults who are almos
of sharyia schools at a can be used in reaching laws, and it restricts the process to islamist. it carbs out autonomy for egypt's military. the brotherhood agreed to this because they need the military to supervisor a referendum in two weeks but that's a very undemocratic thing that the military will not be suspect to civilian oversight and maintain it's own court system. >> eliot: there are essentially two balances acts that were from this constitutional assembly. one where shariya seems to have won out over with what our sense of civil liberties should be, and second, the parliamentary or democratic government in the military, and it maintained some of the power under mubarak ands is that morsi needed to maintain his position at the moment. is that balances balancing act something that we in the united states can live with? >> we have no alternative. there was an election in egypt. no one should be shocked that the muslim brotherhood is trying to impose shariya law. whatever is in this constitution, and my friend here is absolutely right in his assessment, but let's remember, this constitu
) but what is legal and what is criminal? >> this is, no matter what you do, a violation of federal law. (vo) follow real farmers staking their claim on a new frontier. >> lots of terrible things happen to people growing marijuana. >> this crop to me is my livelihood. >> i have everything invested in this. >> eliot: as the clock ticks close the fiscal slope the posturing continues. today the president held a campaign style event in pennsylvania to tout his proposal in the fiscal cliff negotiations saying that the american people made their economic wishes clear on the election day. >> obama: this was a central questions in the election. maybe the central question in the election. you remember. we talked about this a lot. at the end of the day a clear majority of americans--democrats republicans, independents--they agreed with a balanced. >> eliot: republicans meanwhile openly deride the president's proposal saying they're the ones taking negotiations seriously. >> the proposal that was delivered here by secretary geithner the speaker and me yesterday was not a serious proposal. >> i mean, it
sales are private which means under federal law not regulated. >> no background check whatsoever. >> absolutely not. it's like having two different systems at the airport where 60% go through the metal detector and 40% don't. >> i never heard it described that way. that's great. >> we might as well extend it to all gun sales. >> that's a fascinating argument and you are of course right. >> steve barton and eric fuller, thanks, both of you for coming on the program. >> what does it mean and by it, i mean the second tell them it's like being nestled in an eight-way, adjustable, heated and ventilated seat surrounded by a 500-watt sound system while floating on a suspension made of billowy clouds. or you could just hand them your keys. ♪ ♪ >>. >>. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)